Teaching English in South Korea – Some Important Info

The opportunity for teaching English in South Korea can be an exciting and exotic experience of a lifetime. Not only are the students eager to learn English (and are some of the strongest students in the world) but there are the many opportunities to explore the country and learn about a new culture. It can bring a new appreciation about life in another culture and help to stretch and strengthen one’s knowledge base about that culture.

Daily Life
Daily life Monday through Friday revolves around teaching English. The educational system in South Korea is of critical importance to the government so it is not frugal with regard to teaching English to its students, making teachers feel they are playing an important role in the lives of these students.

The working day is shorter in that five to six hours a day are spent in the classroom with an additional hour or two a day for preparation. This leaves many hours during the week for other pursuits, such as visiting new and exciting places, hiking, and going to the beach, etc., particularly during the weekends.

Socializing
Everything is different in South Korea, from the design of the buildings to their furnishings, what people find stylish, social hierarchies and interactions, stores, types of food and prices. Some items may seem cheap in comparison to home, while others may be surprisingly expensive.

It is important to be open to having Korean friends. Try to understand the country’s language and learn a few additional words whenever possible. Students are always appreciative of these efforts as will any Korean friends that are made while in the country.

In the Classroom
Teachers do not need to reinvent the wheel when it comes to teaching materials. There are so many resources available for teaching abroad, specifically for teaching English in South Korea. Materials can be used from teachers who have previously taught the same classes, from coworkers and even from textbooks.

Students from South Korea also like making everything a competition so employing educational games where stickers or points are the rewards for doing well can provide an ideal incentive for learning.

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